On Campus

Early apps on the rise; 93 percent of class submits

By Elana Sulakshana

The class of 2013 submitted early applications to 96 distinct institutions this fall, from nearby within New England to far away in England and Scotland. More than 93% of the class applied to at least one school early action, early decision, or rolling decision.

As of December 1, 238 schools visited BB&N or received applications from students.

“That is a large number of institutions,” said Director of College Counseling Amy Selinger. “It proves that the office is doing a really good job at encouraging [students] to look outside of their comfort zone and what they know.”

According to Ms. Selinger, the college counselors serve as a “mirror.”

She said, “We try to help a student figure out what to do. We lay out the things that are clear and shed light on the statistics.”

This year, the two most popular early schools were University of Michigan and Tulane, closely followed by Dartmouth, University of Vermont (UVM), and Harvard.

An emerging trend is students applying to more than one school early. Among students who submitted multiple applications, the average number was 3.25. Many chose an early decision school and also applied to non-restrictive early action programs, such as University of Chicago, MIT, UMass Amherst, and UVA, as well as Michigan and Tulane.

Schuyler Fried ’13 opted to apply early decision to one school and early action to two.
“I think that it is good to apply to as many schools early as you can so you get them out of the way and are not running into so many apps over or right before Winter Break,” he said. “You might as well try.”

Ella Driscoll ’13 also applied early decision. She was accepted and will be attending Bowdoin College in the fall. “I was excited by Bowdoin. It was the first place where I saw really excited and passionate students and a community that I really wanted to be a part of,” she said. “There’s also a part of me that really wanted me to be done with everything.”

Ms. Selinger said that more students are hearing good news earlier than they were six years ago. In 2006, only 68% of the senior class applied early. “That allows them to be more selective about their regular list,” she added. “We tend to be the voice encouraging students to apply to fewer schools. The multiple early action plan is good because it can lead to smaller lists.”

Walker Maeder-York ’13 applied Single-Choice Early Action to Princeton, which means that he could not apply early decision anywhere or early action most places. When he was accepted to Princeton this December, his list of schools shrunk significantly. “I applied to three total, but I would have applied to twenty-two if I did not get in,” he said.

Only nine students, out of a class of 130, did not The class of 2013 submitted early applications to 96 distinct institutions this fall, from nearby within New England to far away in England and Scotland. More than 93% of the class applied to at least one school early action, early decision, or rolling decision.

As of December 1, 238 schools visited BB&N or received applications from students.

“That is a large number of institutions,” said Director of College Counseling Amy Selinger. “It proves that the office is doing a really good job at encouraging [students] to look outside of their comfort zone and what they know.According to Ms. Selinger, the college counselors serve as a “mirror.”

She said, “We try to help a student figure out what to do. We lay out the things that are clear and shed light on the statistics.”

This year, the two most popular early schools were University of Michigan and Tulane, closely followed by Dartmouth, University of Vermont (UVM), and Harvard.

Evan Frasca ’13 said that he was not interested in applying early because his first choice school did not have an early or rolling option. However, he said, “I regret not applying early anywhere. Having the feeling that you’re in somewhere would be really great.”

On the other hand, Alma Prelec ’13, who also did not apply to any early program, said, “I absolutely do not regret it at all. I wanted more time to work on my Common Application, and I made a lot of edits. I was very happy that I waited.”
Alma did apply to five schools in the United Kingdom with the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service. She submitted the applications in November and will hear back any time before May.

An emerging trend this year was an increased number of applications to schools abroad, particularly in the United Kingdom. “In some ways, the UK is closer than California and the pacific Northwest. The affordability is drastic, and we have also seen an increase in recruiting from those institutions here,” said College Office Manager Sarah McDonald.

There are always a few students who apply abroad, and five students from the Class of 2012 are now studying in the UK.

“There are a handful in this class who are submitting primarily international applications,” Ms. McDonald said. However, every student did apply domestically, either early or regular, to at least one institution in the US.

Most early applicants have now heard back from their schools and are waiting for Early Decision II results, which come back in February, or Regular Decision in March.

“The process went very well. I think that there are a lot of happy students. For those students that did not hear news that they wanted to hear, they are excited about some other regular decision schools,” Ms. McDonald said.

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